January 16, 2017

Program Notes
  • Segment 1:

    A Congressman Who is Boycotting Trump's Inauguration

    We begin with one of a number of Congressmen and women who are boycotting Friday’s inauguration of Donald Trump as the 45th President of the United States, in part because of Trump’s disrespectful tweets denigrating the civil rights icon Congressman John Lewis who marched with King. Congressman Ted Lieu, who represents California’s 33rdDistrict and serves on the House Budget Committee and the House Committee on Oversight and Government Reform, joins us to discuss his reasons for boycotting Trump’s inauguration and Congressman Lewis’s recent remarks questioning Trump’s legitimacy in light of recent revelations that Putin and the Russians meddled in our election to help elect Donald Trump and hurt Hillary Clinton.

  • Segment 2:

    Trump's Public Feud With Congressman Lewis

    Then with Donald Trump’s meeting today with Martin Luther King’s eldest son, we discuss the incoming president’s relations with African Americans following his public feud with Congressman Lewis which adds to the bitter and distrustful mood amongst minorities in this country, many of whom were offended by Trump’s racist remarks during the campaign and were alarmed by how much his candidacy drew support from white supremacists. Christopher Parker, a Professor of Social Justice and Political Science at the University of Washington who is the principal investigator of the Multi-State Survey on Race and Politics, joins us to assess the level of resistance already emerging against a Trump presidency.

  • Segment 3:

    Race Relations in a Trump Administration

    Then finally we speak with Anthea Butler, a Professor of Religious Studies and Graduate Chair in the Department of Religious Studies at the University of Pennsylvania. She joins us to discuss what change is likely to come in a Trump Administration and how much an Attorney General who is a relic of the Old South could turn back the clock in terms of civil and voting rights, along with the head of HUD who is against public housing, and a Labor Secretary who is against worker’s rights, and a Secretary of the Treasury who got rich by evicting people from their homes.